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Tofu, tempeh, and legumes — these are just a few of many plant-based proteins you can include in vegan meals.

When cooking up a lunch or dinner recipe — no matter if it's plant-based or not — it's a good idea to include a protein source.
Proteins have many functions in your body. For example, they:
  • help keep you feeling fuller for longer
  • play a big role in muscle building and maintenance
  • support hair and skin health
  • help form antibodies to strengthen your immune system
  • assist in fluid and pH regulation
In other words, they're much, much more than just a macronutrient that's popular among bodybuilders!
Many people regularly enjoy animal-based proteins like meat, fish, and dairy, easily supplying their bodies with the protein they need. However, when eating a vegan or vegetarian diet, it can be harder to reach those daily protein targets.
Thankfully, the Dinner Twist plant-based recipes are carefully designed, ensuring that they provide plenty of plant-based protein.
Here are some of our favourite plant-based recipes highlighting how you can use non-animal protein sources like tofu, tempeh, and legumes to fuel your body and enhance your health!

TOFU: Mexican tofu sofritas taco platter

Tofu is made from soybean milk. Each 100-gram serving provides 8 grams of protein, in addition to nutrients like manganese, calcium, and selenium.
You can find both firm and silken tofu on supermarket shelves. The firm version can be diced, crumbled or sliced, and is incredibly versatile. Meanwhile, silken tofu is soft and gooey, making it ideal for dishes like scrambles, sauces, or even desserts!
The flavour is neutral, sometimes slightly salty. This means tofu will absorb the flavour of your dish, so don't be afraid to go bold with spices, sauces, condiments, or herbs!
This taco platter recipe combines firm tofu with tomato paste and Mexican spices to give it a rich, satisfying flavour and aroma. Served with lots of veggies and corn tortillas, you definitely won't go hungry!

TEMPEH: Stuffed capsicum

Like tofu, tempeh is based on soybeans. But, while tofu is based on soy milk, tempeh is based on the beans. These have been cooked and then slightly fermented, giving the tempeh a slightly acidic, richer flavour.
Like tofu, tempeh is based on soybeans. But, while tofu is based on soy milk, tempeh is based on the beans. These have been cooked and then slightly fermented, giving the tempeh a slightly acidic, richer flavour.
Thanks to the fermentation process, tempeh also provides probiotics, which support the healthy bacteria in your gut. Per 100-gram serving, tempeh offers 19 grams of protein — more than double what tofu has.
The texture is soft but chunky, with intact pieces of soybean present. This makes the product great for crumbling into dishes like stir-fries.
This stuffed capsicum dish uses crumbled tempeh alongside fibrous red rice and creamy coconut yoghurt.

BLACK BEANS: Black bean enchiladas

There are almost countless types of beans available worldwide. A popular type is black beans, renowned for versatility, texture, flavour, and nutrient profile.
In fact, cooked black beans provide 8.9 grams of protein per 100 grams, alongside plenty of potassium, folate, and iron.
They boast a soft and slightly chewy consistency and mild, savory flavour, making them a frequent star in Mexican-style dishes like chillies and burritos. Plus, you can mash/blend them and use in protein-packed bean brownies — without the mild bean flavour shining through.
Try this recipe for black bean & nut cheese enchiladas for a guilt-free Mexican-style meal that'll satisfy the whole family.


SEEDS & NUTS: Hemp seed & black rice salad with cashew cream cheese

Seeds and nuts are not only a good way to get some PB protein, but also healthy fats and fibre. Plus, they provide texture and flavour to your meals!
For example, hemp seeds (also referred to as hemp hearts) feature a nutty taste and plenty of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, which support heart health. They also contain a whopping 31.6 grams of protein per 100 grams!
Similarly, nuts are rich in healthy fats and protein. For example, cashews boast 18.2 grams of protein per 100-gram serving.
Nuts and seeds are versatile as can be. You can add them to salads, baked goods, stir-fries, and much more.
To enjoy them, why not cook up this recipe for a beautiful, wholesome spring rice salad with cashew cream cheese, veggies, and hemp seeds?

CHICKPEAS: Corn fritters with chickpea & nut cheese salad

We love tinned chickpeas; they can be used as-is, pan-fried, oven-roasted, in stews, in stir-fries, in salads, and (importantly) in homemade hummus!
You can even use the water from the tin (referred to as aquafaba) to make vegan whipped 'cream', meringue, or mousse.
Besides their many uses, chickpeas are cherished for their 7 grams of protein per 100 grams, fiber, and nutrients like manganese, copper, and folate.
Besides their many uses, chickpeas are cherished for their 7 grams of protein per 100 grams, fiber, and nutrients like manganese, copper, and folate.
This recipe pairs chickpeas with a nourishing salad, roasted carrots, and homemade corn fritters.
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